PCOH 3105
6048224640
Professor
Ted T. Aoki Award for Distinguished Service in Canadian Curriculum Studies, 2013
Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring, 2012
Sam Black Award for Excellence in Education and Development in the Visual and Performing Arts, 2001
Killam Teaching Award, Faculty of Education, 1995
Portrayals of teachers’ lives: Investigating teacher education through popular culture

Funding and Duration: $151,235 (2011-2014)

Source: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Role: Carl Leggo, Co-Investigator

Description: The purpose of this study is to investigate: 1) how contemporary and historic portrayals of lives of teachers are rendered in popular culture through integrative methods of creative nonfiction, digital media and life writing; 2) how these methods demonstrate exemplary participatory arts practice; and 3) how the emergence of integrative methods in teacher education reflects diverse ways of thinking about educational programming and curriculum. The key objectives in this study are to assess the methodological value of using integrative methods of creative nonfiction, digital media and life writing as both art and research, and how the application of these methods contributes to discourses that promise to improve practice in the area of teacher education. (The research team includes: Anita Sinner [principal], Erika Hasebe-Ludt, and Carl Leggo.)

Becoming Pedagogical through A/r/tography in Teacher Education

Funding and Duration: $147,600 (2008-2011)

Source: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Role: Carl Leggo, Co-Investigator

Description: The purpose of the proposed study is to investigate how a/r/tography is uniquely situated to enact, develop and problematize becoming pedagogical in a teacher education program. A/r/tography is a hybrid form of practice-based action research within education and the arts. Drawing upon the professional practices of educators and artists, becoming pedagogical within a teacher education context asserts that teacher candidates who are engaged in inquiry that uses their artistic and pedagogical sensibilities and capabilities in ongoing, disciplined, community-engaged, dialogic forms of research are able to problematize what it means to become pedagogical. (The research team includes: Rita Irwin [principal], George Belliveau, Stephanie Springgay, Donal O’Donoghue, and Peter Gouzouasis.)

Doing Time: A Time for Incarcerated Women to Develop an Action Health Strategy

Funding and Duration: $372,000 (2008-2010)

Source: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Role: Carl Leggo, Co-Investigator

Description: The purposes of this study are to determine the impact of women’s abilities to meet their health and social needs during the year following release from prison on the success of their re-integration into communities; and to evaluate and foster community-based peer support of released women; and to engage newly released women, health authorities, regional and provincial government and prison officials in translating the research into a health action strategy to support improved health and successful reintegration into society among women transitioning from prison. As part of this research project, women who have left prison will be invited to engage in creative writing as an educational and healing activity. (The principal investigators are R. Martin and P. Janssen. Leggo is one of a team of fifteen co-investigators.)

Rewriting Literacy Curriculum in Canadian Cosmopolitan Schools

Funding and Duration: $91,320 (2007-2010)

Source: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Role: Carl Leggo, Co-Investigator

Description: Teacher education and schooling in Canada face unprecedented challenges as a result of globalization, intercultural/international migration, and changes in local literate and cultural practices. This study (with Erika Hasebe-Ludt [principal] and Cynthia Chambers) is investigating crucial issues arising from these movements for educational institutions and populations in Canada. Specifically, the research focuses on the education of teachers and their students by engaging them in life writing as a form of teacher research. It also seeks to create opportunities for collaborative research among faculty members and teachers through life writing, with the aim of identifying appropriate theoretical and pedagogical frameworks for the study and practice of literacy, curriculum, and teacher education in culturally diverse schooling environments.