Literacy Education (LITR)

Our programs in Literacy Education engage teachers and other professional educators in the study of rich language and literacy practices from early childhood through adolescence and adulthood. Literacy studies have expanded dramatically in recent years and our internationally known Faculty draw on many disciplines that inform the study of language and literacy education, including cognitive, linguistic, anthropological, cultural, literary, critical and post-structural perspectives. In our courses we invite students to reflect critically on contemporary language and literacy practices in and out of schools, spanning local, national and global contexts. Our focus is on the many rich, multiethnic and multilingual contexts of language and literacy learning in our schools and communities.

Diploma in Literacy Education

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The Diploma in Language and Literacy Education is an in-service program for teachers and administrators who wish to deepen and extend their knowledge of curriculum, instruction, assessment and evaluation for diverse types of school populations. It encompasses the various aspects of Language and Literacy Education, including: oral and written communication, reading, children’s and adolescent’s literature, drama, English education, French education, and modern languages education. Students may choose either to focus on a particular aspect of language and literacy education, to select a variety of courses from among the various areas of language arts, or a combination of the two.

A minimum of one year’s teaching experience is strongly recommended.

Courses (21- 24 credits)

Focus area Courses
Reading/Literacy/Language Arts LLED 391, 438, 439, 450, 451, 452, 454, 456, 459, 479, 480, 481, 482, 486
Materials and Resources of Literacy Instruction LIBE 463, LLED 453, 462, 469, 481
Children’s Literature LLED 440, 441, 442, 443, 444, 445, 446, 449
Drama LLED 313, 333, 334, 335, 435
French LLED 323, 324, 325, 420, 426, 428, 429

Electives (6-9 credits)

Courses at the 300 – 400 level in Language and Literacy Education, other Departments in the Faculty of Education or the Faculty of Arts.


Application

Admissions for Diplomas and Certificate programs are handled by the Professional Development and Community Engagement office. Please visit their website for application procedures. For program advice and other questions, please consult with Program Coordinator Lorrie Miller, or call 604-822-9128.

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MEd in Literacy Education

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The MEd degree is designed as a practitioner’s degree, for students who wish to acquire the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to work in a professional field. As a professional degree, the MEd is intended for students who wish, upon graduation, to assume positions of leadership in a practical setting or positions requiring more advanced study than that available at the bachelor’s level. Although MEd students are not required to carry out and defend an independent research project, the program is nevertheless research-based in that consideration of educationally-relevant research constitutes a major focus of study.

The Master of Education program in Language and Literacy Education is designed for students engaging in applied research in language education, language study, literacy, and the teaching of literature. The program consists of course work and includes the option of completing a graduating project. Examples of research areas in the Department are: bilingual education, second language education, socio-cultural dimensions of literacy learning, early reading and writing development, early language development, oral language in the classroom, drama in education, literacy across cultures, multi-modal and digital literacies, post-structuralist critical theory, written composition, language assessment, the role of children’s literature in language and literacy, and educational linguistics.

A small number of M.Ed students each year who demonstrate outstanding performance and whose research interests align with those of an available supervisor may be allowed to switch to the MA program after their second semester.


Admissions Requirements

Basic program admissions requirements include:

  • an approved Bachelor’s degree and, for K-12 teachers, one year of teacher education;* OR
  • a 5-year Bachelor’s degree in Education; OR
  • a 4-year Bachelor’s degree in Education or other appropriate area provided the applicant has completed all the necessary prerequisites listed on the detailed admissions information page linked below.

Holders of 3-year Canadian degrees require a fourth or honours year.
Note: Students applying for an MEd or MA in TESL and MLED are not required to have one year of teacher education, although two years of formal teaching experience is required.

View detailed program requirements


Focal Areas

The LLED MEd is a course-based degree. Students normally take 10 courses fulfilling the following guidelines:

M.Ed Program Requirements

  • 30 credits in total are required for graduation
  • 24 credits must be comprised of 500-level courses
  • No more than 6 credits may be 300- or 400-level courses
  • EDUC 500 is required
  • Minimum of 12 credits are normally taken from across the range of LLED course offerings
  • Remaining credits may be comprised of 500-level courses in LLED or other departments
  • A graduating project (LLED 590) (Note: this is not required)
  • The program must be completed in 5 years

The Department takes a critical and social justice approach to theory and research. Faculty members in the Literacy program have expertise in the following areas:

  1. Indigenous languages and literacies
  2. Literature and cultural texts for children and youth
  3. Drama and theatre education in schools and communities
  4. Literary and literacy practices in families, schools, and communities
  5. Digital cultures, multimodality, and communication ecologies/studies

MEd handbook


Application

The applications page gives details on deadlines, the online application process, application requirements and English language requirements.

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MA in Literacy Education

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The MA degree is intended for students interested in conducting a research study or who wish, upon graduation, to assume a research position or to proceed to doctoral level studies. Accordingly, the MA program is designed specifically as a research degree, with students required to carry out and complete an independent research project (Master’s Thesis). Completion of an MA thesis is viewed as a prerequisite for the pursuit of doctoral studies in most institutions.

The Master of Arts program in Language and Literacy Education is designed for students engaging in applied research in language education, language study, literacy, and the teaching of literature. The program consists of course work and a thesis. Examples of research areas in the Department are: bilingual education, second language education, socio-cultural dimensions of literacy learning, early reading and writing development, early language development, oral language in the classroom, drama in education, literacy across cultures, multi-modal and digital literacies, post-structuralist critical theory, written composition, language assessment, the role of children’s literature in language and literacy, and educational linguistics.

Applicants to the MA program may be accepted to M.Ed. instead if they are not deemed to be sufficiently competitive at this time to undertake original thesis research in our program.


Admissions Requirements

Basic program admissions requirements include:

  • an approved Bachelor’s degree and, for K-12 teachers, one year of teacher education;* OR
  • a 5-year Bachelor’s degree in Education; OR
  • a 4-year Bachelor’s degree in Education or other appropriate area provided the applicant has completed all the necessary prerequisites listed on the detailed admissions information page linked below.

Holders of 3-year Canadian degrees require a fourth or honours year.
Note: Students applying for an MEd or MA in TESL and MLED are not required to have one year of teacher education, although two years of formal teaching experience is required.

View detailed program requirements


Focal Areas

This degree requires a minimum of 30 credits including 24 credits at the 500-level or above. These 30 credits are to be divided as follows:

MA Program Requirements

  • Minimum 30 credits, with 24 credits at the 500-level or above.
  • EDUC 500
  • Master’s Thesis – 9 credits
  • 12 credits must be level 500 in the specialization area of LLED
  • Research core (in consultation with supervisor) – 6 credits recommended
  • Program must be completed within 5 years

The Department takes a critical and social justice approach to theory and research. Faculty members in the Literacy program have expertise in the following areas:

  1. Indigenous languages and literacies
  2. Literature and cultural texts for children and youth
  3. Drama and theatre education in schools and communities
  4. Literary and literacy practices in families, schools, and communities
  5. Digital cultures, multimodality, and communication ecologies/studies

MA handbook


Application

The applications page gives details on deadlines, the online application process, application requirements and English language requirements.

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PhD in Literacy Education

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For admission procedures and document-related queries, please contact lled.gradassistant@ubc.ca
The department Graduate Academic Advisor, Dr. Ling Shi is available to answer any academic-related questions.

Literacy Education is a sub-specialization within the Language and Literacy Education Doctoral program. Students pursuing Literacy Education will receive an LLED PhD.

Doctoral studies in Language, Literacy and Education focus on critical and contemporary issues at the intersections of literacy learning and cultural and societal transformation. Students in our programs are teachers and other professional educators who engage in courses, conversations and research addressing a broad range of issues and contexts – in and out of schools, nationally and internationally, and across the lifespan.

Students will gain expertise in topics such as identity and literacy, cultural literacy practices, Indigenous literacies, family literacy, literature and new media, digital literacies, poetry, literacy in developing contexts, literacy development across the lifespan, educational linguistics, discourse and multimodal analysis, critical perspectives on children’s and young adult literature, EAL (English as an additional language) literacy, assessment, teacher education and creative/arts-based approaches to literacy learning.

Students in our program engage with critical societal issues that impact these topics, such as equity and inclusion, immigration and globalization, gender, youth culture, relationships among communities and educational institutions, and public policy.


Admissions Requirements

Admission to the doctoral program is highly competitive and we have the capacity to admit only a few of the many qualified applicants each year. We strongly advise you to become familiar with the information posted on the department web page including policy and procedures and the research programs of faculty members. Admissions decisions are made by a committee and, unfortunately, individual professors are unable to assess applications in advance of the committee’s adjudication. The link below details all the admissions requirements for the PhD program.

View detailed admissions requirements


Focal Areas

The PhD in Language & Literacy Education may be completed in any of our program specializations. It normally consists of a one-year residency in the Department, together with a dissertation.

Students are normally expected to advance to candidacy by the end of their third year (having completed their comprehensive exams and dissertation proposal, and relevant coursework).

PhD Program Requirements

  • Doctoral Seminars: LLED 601 and LLED 602 (required)
  • Coursework: 18 to 24 credits
  • Seminars
  • Comprehensive Examinations
  • Dissertation Proposal
  • Application and Approval to Candidacy
  • Proposal Presentation
  • PhD Dissertation
  • Program must be completed within 6 years.
  • Must be approved for candidacy within the first 3 years (complete courses, comprehensive exams, and thesis proposal approved). If not, needs program extension.
  • Must be full-time, no part-time option

The Department takes a critical and social justice approach to theory and research. Faculty members in the Literacy program have expertise in the following areas:

  1. Indigenous languages and literacies
  2. Literature and cultural texts for children and youth
  3. Drama and theatre education in schools and communities
  4. Literary and literacy practices in families, schools, and communities
  5. Digital cultures, multimodality, and communication ecologies/studies

PhD handbook


Application

The PhD program has only one start date for international and domestic students which is September each year.
To read application information and apply online, click the apply button below.

Please forward supporting documents to:
Graduate Program Assistant
Department of Language & Literacy Education
University of British Columbia
6445 University Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z2
Telephone: (604) 822-8259
Facsimile: (604) 822-3154
e-mail: lled.gradassistant@ubc.ca

The department Graduate Academic Advisor, Dr. Ling Shi is available to answer any academic-related questions.

For admission procedures and document-related queries, please contact lled.gradassistant@ubc.ca

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PhD

Difference at play: An enthnography of discourse and drama in multiracial classrooms in a Francophone minority language school
Author: Schroeter, Sara – Supervisor: Dr. Theresa Rogers and Dr. Annette Henry (04/17)

(Re)turning to the poetic I/eye: towards a literacy of light
Author: Rajabali, Anar – Supervisor: Dr. Carl Leggo (03/17)

School literacy as a catalyst: A portrait from multilingual, low-educated homes in Turkey
Author: Kocbas, Dilara – Supervisor: Dr. Marilyn Chapman (11/16)

Following the song of k’aad ‘aww (Dogfish Mother): adolescent perspectives on English 10 First Peoples, writing, and identity
Author: Davidson, Sara – Supervisors: Dr. Carl Leggo and Theresa Rogers (10/16)

Visiting Griffin at the confluence of playwriting, ethics, and spirit: towards poet(h)ic inquiry in research-based theatre
Author: Duff, Heather – Supervisor: Dr. George Belliveau (9/16)

Pedagogy of Confidence: Auditory Accounts of Adult ESL Classes with Educational Drama
Author: Kim, Won – Supervisor: Dr. Carl Leggo (5/16)

Reclaiming Kwak’wala Through Co-constructing Gwanti’lakw’s Vision
Author: Cranmer, Laura – Supervisor: Dr. Carl Leggo (11/15)

Parent-child shared reading: The affordances of print, digital and hand-held electronic books
Author: Kim, Ji Eun – Supervisors: Dr. Jim Anderson and Dr. Geoff Williams (09/15)

The classroom impact of Reading Recovery training: examining restated Reading Recovery-based teacher learning
Author: Stouffer, Joseph – Supervisor: Dr. Purcell-Gates (06/15)

Meaning making within the social activity domain of health maintenance: The role of social networks
Author: Nimmon, Laura – Supervisor: Dr. Purcell-Gates (11/14)

The story of an idea: moving with a playmaking education
Author: MacKenzie, Donard J. – Supervisors: Dr. Carl Leggo, Prof. Stephen Heatley (Theatre) (02/15)

Applied drama as engaging pedagogy: critical multimodal literacies with street youth
Author: Wager, Amanda – Supervisors: Dr. Theresa Rogers, Dr. George Belliveau (09/14)

Pathways through the woods: How the cohesive resources of colour and repetition contribute to the construction of coherent narrative picturebook texts
Author: Shoemaker, Kathryn – Supervisors: Dr. Theresa Rogers, Dr. Geoff Williams(05/14)

Poetics of return: toward poetic imagination and peacebuilding
Author: Kramer, Christi – Supervisors: Dr. Carl Leggo, Dr. Maureen Kendrick (05/14)

Portrait of a Teacher: Stories That Won’t Go Away
Author: Hill, Peter – Supervisor: Dr. Carl Leggo (05/14)

Homa Bay Memories: using research-based theatre to explore a narrative inheritance
Author: Lea, Graham – Supervisor: Dr. George Belliveau (12/13)

Being tough, staying good, and playing inside the box: An ethnographic case study of one boy’s multimodal textmaking
Author: Collier, Diane – Supervisor: Dr. Maureen Kendrick (07/13)

ICT, Multilingual Primary Education and Classroom Pedagogy in Northern Uganda
Author: Oates, Lauryn – Supervisors: Dr. Maureen Kendrick, Dr. Bonny Norton (08/12)

An investigation of the cross-mode comparability of a paper and computer-based multiple-choice cloze reading assessment for ESL learners
Author: Murphy Odo, Dennis – Supervisor: Dr. Lee Gunderson (05/12)

Social art effect: the a/r/tography and complexity of theatre education learning systems, developmental stages, and change mechanisms
Author: Beare, David – Supervisor: Dr. George Belliveau (10/12)

Narrative practices in immersive gameworlds: personal growth and social change
Author: Boskic, Natasha – Supervisor: Dr. Teresa Dobson (10/11)

The new literacies of Web 2.0: a case study of one school district
Author: Moayeri, Maryam – Supervisor: Dr. Marlene Asselin (06/11)

Theatre as a place of learning: The forces and affects of devised theatre processes in education
Author: Perry, Mia – Supervisors: Dr. C. Medina, Dr. T. Rogers (11/10)

Exploring the reading non-engagement of two grade six students during sustained silent reading
Author: Bryan, Gregory – Supervisor: Dr. J. Anderson (05/10)

Affordances and recontextualizations: A multiple-case study of young children’s engagement in information literacy practices in school and out-of-school contexts
Author: McTavish, Marianne – Supervisor: Dr. M. Chapman (05/10)

Through the gates of loving inquiry: where the heart opens into relationship
Author: Shira, Ahava – Supervisor: Dr. C. Leggo (05/10)

Emancipation, empowerment and embodiment: Exploring the influence of organizational dynamics on one school’s journey to promote positive behaviour and social responsibility
Author: White, Vincent – Supervisor: Dr. G. Belliveau (05/10)

Authorship as assemblage: Multimodal literacies of play, literature, and drama
Author: Winter, Kari-Lynn – Supervisor: Dr. T. Rogers (05/10)

MA

Gender in Young Adult Literature: Harry Potter and The Hunger Games
Author: Riddell, Sarah – Supervisor: Dr. Teresa Dobson (08/16)

A female refugee’s investment in multiple literacies post-migration
Author: Crosbie, Kate – Supervisor: Dr. Marlene Asselin (04/16)

Community-Based Materials Development: Using Digital Storytelling for Teaching and Learning Indigenous Languages
Author: Ryan, Keeley – Supervisors: Dr. Candace Galla and Dr. Annette Henry (04/16)

Breaking the line
Author: Vincent, Adam – Supervisor: Dr. Carl Leggo (08/15)

Heartfelt inquiry: A parallactic approach to ELA curriculum
Author: Archacka, Natalia – Supervisor: Dr. Carl Leggo (07/15)

Expanding the circle: Collaborative research to create culturally responsive family literacy
Author: Gear, Allison – Supervisors: Dr. Jim Anderson and Dr. Jan Hare (03/15)

Making short films in French class: the role of collaborative short film production in social cohesion and student engagement in the core French classroom
Author: Garcia Castillo, Erin – Supervisor: Dr. George Belliveau (10/12)

Approaches to Teaching World Literature in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program: A Narrative Inquiry
Author: Morton, Elizabeth – Supervisor: Dr. Carl Leggo (10/12)

“You can study with joy”: exploring international students’ attitudes and opinions regarding their educational experiences in a Canadian secondary school
Author: Arnott, Amanda – Supervisor: Teresa Dobson (05/12)

Exploring cultural resources as pedagogical tools for language education: a case of two primary schools in Uganda
Author: Maandebo Abiria, Doris – Supervisors: Dr. Maureen Kendrick, Dr. Margaret Early (06/11)

Reading the visual: the role of picturebooks in facilitating young adult literacy
Author: Thomson, Katherine – Supervisor: Dr. Margot Filipenko (05/11)

Playing with Possibilities: Drama in the Elementary Core French Classroom
Author: Ziltener, Eva- Supervisor: Dr. G. Bellieveau (02/11)

Research in Three Acts: Approaches to Developing Research-based Theatre
Author: Lea, Graham – Supervisor: Dr. G. Belliveau (11/10)

Breaking the silence: Beginning teachers share pathways out of the profession
Author: Beck, Jaime – Supervisor: Dr. G. Belliveau (11/10)

Cultural hybridity and visual representations of the immigrant journey
Author: Ho, Charmaine – Supervisor: Dr. T. Rogers (11/10)

The Harry Potter phenomenon and its implications for literacy education
Author: Novosel, Jadranka – Supervisor: Dr. T. Dobson (11/10)